How To Write A Grant

How to Write a Grant | Know The Process

Knowing how to write a grant starts with your  your funding opportunities.  This step is followed by the writing and proper editing of such grant application.  This includes the grant specific aims, main body, and preparation of your final budget.

Below you will find information on how to effectively write a grant application as well as resources for understanding the grant review and submission process.   If you would like more assistant in learning how to write a grant contact us directly for a consultation service. 

How to Write a Grant – Part 4 – Preparing the Budget and Final Submission.
The fourth, and last, part of my “How to Write a Grant Proposal” series is organizing the budget and finally, uploading the entire grant application. Regarding the budget, many granting entities allow a “modular” budget, up to the full limit of the award. A modular budget requires only a basic description of your appropriations for items such as personnel, supplies, equipment, travel, etc. Generally, one brief paragraph is recommended for each budget entry.
How to Write a Grant – Part 3 – Main Body and Abstract Preparation
Identifying the appropriate funding source and initial contact. The first aspect of how to write a grant, and securing funding for your idea, is to identify public or private entities committed to sponsoring research in your specific field of expertise. For example, if you are an academic investigator interested in examining specific gene anomalies in lung cancer, private funding sources might include the American Lung Association and the American Cancer Association.
How to Write a Grant – Part 2 – Preparation of the Specific Aims and Narrative
Following identification of, and perhaps initial inquiry to, the most promising entity for funding your concept, the next step in grant writing is organization of your ideas. Most grant-funding agencies require some type of organized statement of your research idea, as expressed as a discrete set of goals or objectives. For research funding applications to U.S. governmental agencies, including NIH grants, a one-page “specific aims” section is usually required (or very strongly encouraged) for inclusion with the other sections comprising the entire grant application.
How to write a grant – Part 1- Identifying Funding Source And Initial Contact
Identifying the appropriate funding source and initial contact. The first aspect of how to write a grant, and securing funding for your idea, is to identify public or private entities committed to sponsoring research in your specific field of expertise. For example, if you are an academic investigator interested in examining specific gene anomalies in lung cancer, private funding sources might include the American Lung Association and the American Cancer Association.